Monday, September 26, 2016

Teaching Tip #20



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #20
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
In his book, Elmore clearly loves acronyms, which might just turn off every single teacher who reads his book, but if you can put up with them, they really are interesting and worth your time.
One of his acronyms that applies to this generation is “EPIC.”  Emore states that this is an EPIC generation in several ways.
Here is how that breaks down.  I’ll also look at how each term has implications for us as teachers.
P - Participatory
This generation has grown up participating in nearly every aspect of their lives.  Take television, for example.  Generation X consumed hours upon hours of TV every day.  Yet it was a strictly one-way experience.  It was all passive.  That isn’t true for either the millennials or Gen Z.  You can’t watch a reality TV show without having to call, text, or tweet to see who remains on the island.  Thanks to DVRs, my kids can gloss over every single commercial, having total control over the shows they watch.  Furthermore, if you have Netflix, you can choose to watch an entire season (or entire seasons) of shows in one sitting.
How can we strive to have students take active roles in how they participate in our classes, other than sitting and passively scribbling notes.  I’m not saying that’s always bad.  Some passivity is necessary.  However, if that is the bulk what is happening in your class, you’re missing a golden opportunity.  Worse yet, other teachers are allowing students to participate more and more in their classes, so you are falling even further behind.

Friday, September 23, 2016

TeachingTip #19



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #19
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
In his book, Elmore clearly loves acronyms, which might just turn off every single teacher who reads his book, but if you can put up with them, they really are interesting and worth your time.
One of his acronyms that applies to this generation is “EPIC.”  Elmore states that this is an EPIC generation in several ways.
Here is how that breaks down.  I’ll also look at how each term has implications for us as teachers.
E – Experiential
As researchers have documented for a decade now, this generation, beginning with the Millennials and extending to Generation Z, doesn’t crave to be taught.  Instead, they thrive when they are coached.  That means they seek to have a meaningful experience with their teachers.  They don’t simply want education dumped on them.
Now that might not be the ideal for all teachers, but how effective do you want to be?  If you really want to impact students, seek to have meaningful experiences with them.  If you don’t, what are you doing in this profession?

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Teaching Tip #18



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #18
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
The problems, Elmore notes, for the digital generation, though, is that a lot of their characteristics both help . . . and hinder them.
For example – they want to start and be part of a strong, healthy family unit.  Yet, they are delaying adulthood later and later.  Someone said the 38 is the new 28.  Really?  When exactly is middle age then?
Because children are growing up quicker than ever (there is little doubt that children are physically maturing much faster than previous generations) they are ready (at least physically) for adulthood, but the world we have created for them (where we have enabled and coddled them and given them the message that many of them need to go to college for degrees that are more expensive than ever before in order to get jobs that may (but probably won’t) be there when they graduate) a world that they simply aren’t ready for in terms of maturity and responsibility.
This just seems cruel to me.  And it is a problem that needs to be addresses.  If it isn’t addressed at home, how can we address it in school?

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Teaching Tip #17



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #17
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
Finally, this generation has a strong desire to be entrepreneurial.
Now I think this is great.  As Godin, Ramsey, Vaynerchuk and many, many more have noted this is the best time to go into business.
First, there are more problems to solve than every before.  You want to start a gym to help the majority of our population (your’s truly included) who are fat and need to lose weight.  Go ahead.  You want to start a website that democratized commerce (as ebay did and as Etsy is doing now too).  Go ahead.  You want to start a business repairing cracked iPod, iPhone, and iPad screens (as one of our former cleaners did for awhile).  Go ahead.  The tools are there.  And most of those tools are free.
Second, people are just waiting to buy the thing they never knew they actually needed.   Twenty years ago who knew we needed bottled water?  A George Foreman grill?  Essential oils? Supplements?  Digital music.  Or phones we keep in our pockets and never even talk on?
Third, the old school jobs – the baker, the plumber, the electrician, the handy man or carpenter, aren’t going away any time soon.  In fact, when I need a plumber, it was all I could do to find one who could squeeze a small job like mine into their schedules.  The same was true for when I needed gutters installed on my house after it was resided.  There are still a ton of opportunities for students who want to go into these fields.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Teaching Tip #16



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #16
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
Another characteristics of this digital generation is that they are family oriented.  Believe it or not.
Maybe this comes from the fact that this younger generation is closer to their parents than almost anyone else.  Maybe it’s because – as parents – we have protected and enabled them.
Whatever it is, they feel a strong need – whether they are in a solid family unit or not – to develop a supportive and loving family.
Ask yourself, how can you capitalize on that in your classroom?

Monday, September 19, 2016

Teaching Tip #15



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #15
One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY.
Elmore also notes how this generation is far more tech savvy and comfortable learning form tech than any generation prior.  As many of our students will tell us they consider technology as essential as water and air.
If you don’t believe me, just watch what an elementary student can do with your iPhone or their iPad.
How can we find interesting and relevant ways to use technology in our classes to engage Generation iY?  I have seen teachers have great success with having a “social media” student of the day to Tweet or Snapchat or Instagram out the events of the day as a way to teach digital citizenship.  I have seen language teachers Skype with native speakers from their home countries during class.  I have even seen teachers videotape their traditional lessons and play them to the class because this generation is more likely to pay attention to videos delivering content than an actual teacher up in front of them delivering the same content!  Whatever works.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Teaching Tip #14



Teacherscribe’s Teaching Tip #14

One of the books from my summer reading list was by Tim Elmore’s Generation iY. 

This generation is also great at thinking outside of the box.  Because of the digital tools they have been raised with, they excel at what Thomas Friedman calls “creative mixing.”  They can take one idea and apply it to a totally different area to create something that never existed before.

Friedman gives an example of this from one of his talks at MIT.  To illustrate the concept of “creative mixing,” Friedman, who writes for the New York Times, said to the MIT students that the Times has given him permission to accept resumes from them because the Times is looking for engineers.  However, Friedman warns that they shouldn’t think of applying if they don’t read at least three old-school newspapers a day.  Why?  The Times can easily outsource engineering talent from India at a fraction of the cost of what American engineers cost.  What the Times is really looking for – and really needs – is someone who can take their engineering expertise and apply it to the newspaper industry so that they create something that has never been created before. 


And that is what this generation excels at.  Or at least according to Elmore.
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