Monday, November 23, 2015

Ch. 2 - Master the Art of Storytelling

For this chapter, watch the clip below and leave brief feedback of whether or not Taylor Mali was able to nail the art of story telling.  I include this because I saw him perform this on Thursday afternoon.




Some things to think about?

1.  Does it come across as too "rehearsed"?
2.  How does Mali communicate his emotion?
3.  Does all of the practice he poured into this presentation pay off?
4.  Does he "sell" you on his idea?
5.  Are his examples effective?
6.  What is his strongest area? (emotion, novelty, or being memorable)?

 Do the same for the second talk embedded as well.  Is passion everything?



1.  What is his biggest mistake?
2.  He is clearly passionate, but why isn't passion enough?
3.  What could he have done better?
4.  Are his examples effective?
5.  Does he "sell" you on his idea?
6.  What is his strongest area? (emotion, lovely, or being memorable)?

Then leave two pieces of feedback to your peers.

Thanks

28 comments:

Riley B said...

The fact that his presentation does seem rehearsed makes his point more clear and memorable. He has a clear story of a dinner where the table talk just got to be too much. He connects his emotion to the audience in a great way because he is passionate about the topic, very passionate. His passion gives him an edge and makes his presentation brilliant. His examples of what he does in the class room can connect to almost everybody who has attended school as a student. He talks about making a C feel like a congressional medal of honor. Every body had worked hard for a grade wether it's a C or an A, if the hard work pays off it is a unforgettable feeling. He hits all three of the areas and I can not pick one that is more important than the other. In this presentation emotion, novelty, and memorability are all taken to the highest standard. I know I will remember this presentation.

The second presentation embedded in the blog is not something I want to watch again. This man is overly passionate in the wrong setting. There is a time and place when yelling and intensity is acceptable and also I time when it is not acceptable. He is in a setting where it is not acceptable and he takes it over the top. He is not even ready to give his presentation. He refers to a sheet of paper every few seconds to remind himself what he needs to say. The first video the presentation was all done from memory. His examples are not clear, relatable, or effective.

Riley B said...

The fact that his presentation does seem rehearsed makes his point more clear and memorable. He has a clear story of a dinner where the table talk just got to be too much. He connects his emotion to the audience in a great way because he is passionate about the topic, very passionate. His passion gives him an edge and makes his presentation brilliant. His examples of what he does in the class room can connect to almost everybody who has attended school as a student. He talks about making a C feel like a congressional medal of honor. Every body had worked hard for a grade wether it's a C or an A, if the hard work pays off it is a unforgettable feeling. He hits all three of the areas and I can not pick one that is more important than the other. In this presentation emotion, novelty, and memorability are all taken to the highest standard. I know I will remember this presentation.

The second presentation embedded in the blog is not something I want to watch again. This man is overly passionate in the wrong setting. There is a time and place when yelling and intensity is acceptable and also I time when it is not acceptable. He is in a setting where it is not acceptable and he takes it over the top. He is not even ready to give his presentation. He refers to a sheet of paper every few seconds to remind himself what he needs to say. The first video the presentation was all done from memory. His examples are not clear, relatable, or effective.

Kade Nelson said...

I don't feel like it comes across as too rehearsed. He knew what he was doing and he did a very good job of relaying his message to us in an entertaining and effective way.
You can just hear it in his voice how passionate he is about the poem he has written. He is excited and laughing and cracking jokes, and you can tell he is having a great time saying his poem to everyone.
His practice absolutely pays off. You can tell he has spent a good amount of time preparing this poem and getting ready to present it, and he kills it. It is one of the most entertaining poems I have ever listened to, and his obvious passion for the subject makes it that much better.
His examples are very effective. He has examples that backs up what he believes and he relays that information to us in an entertaining way that holds our attention.
Emotion to me is this mans strongest area. His emotion and passion is so obvious. It is awesome. This man is a truly great speaker.

Kade Nelson said...

I don't feel like it comes across as too rehearsed. He knew what he was doing and he did a very good job of relaying his message to us in an entertaining and effective way.
You can just hear it in his voice how passionate he is about the poem he has written. He is excited and laughing and cracking jokes, and you can tell he is having a great time saying his poem to everyone.
His practice absolutely pays off. You can tell he has spent a good amount of time preparing this poem and getting ready to present it, and he kills it. It is one of the most entertaining poems I have ever listened to, and his obvious passion for the subject makes it that much better.
His examples are very effective. He has examples that backs up what he believes and he relays that information to us in an entertaining way that holds our attention.
Emotion to me is this mans strongest area. His emotion and passion is so obvious. It is awesome. This man is a truly great speaker.

Alyce Huot said...

Video 1:
The audience members are able to see that it is rehearsed enough, but Taylor CLEARLY leaves plenty of room for true emotion to show. He does this wonderfully by choosing his words carefully, raising his voice at certain times, getting red in the face, and altering hi hand gestures. I would say that the amount of practice that he did for this poem was the right amount. In fact it is the perfect amount to get his point/moral across. Because of his emotion and passion he is able to clearly get his points across, many that are relatable and understandable.

Video 2:
This politician has the same amount of passion as Taylor but he doesn’t show it as methodically as Taylor, and as a result he comes across a little too strong. His mistakes are that he doesn’t know the speech enough by heart and has to constantly ruin his streak to look back at his notes. On top of the note errors he also comes off really strong, like I said earlier, a little too strong. His strongest area is emotion and he does make it memorable, but not the good memorable. So he does sell me on his idea, but only because I’d be afraid he would seek me out and kill me if I didn’t follow him.

Alyce Huot said...

Video 1:
The audience members are able to see that it is rehearsed enough, but Taylor CLEARLY leaves plenty of room for true emotion to show. He does this wonderfully by choosing his words carefully, raising his voice at certain times, getting red in the face, and altering hi hand gestures. I would say that the amount of practice that he did for this poem was the right amount. In fact it is the perfect amount to get his point/moral across. Because of his emotion and passion he is able to clearly get his points across, many that are relatable and understandable.

Video 2:
This politician has the same amount of passion as Taylor but he doesn’t show it as methodically as Taylor, and as a result he comes across a little too strong. His mistakes are that he doesn’t know the speech enough by heart and has to constantly ruin his streak to look back at his notes. On top of the note errors he also comes off really strong, like I said earlier, a little too strong. His strongest area is emotion and he does make it memorable, but not the good memorable. So he does sell me on his idea, but only because I’d be afraid he would seek me out and kill me if I didn’t follow him.

Alyce Huot said...

Video 1:
The audience members are able to see that it is rehearsed enough, but Taylor CLEARLY leaves plenty of room for true emotion to show. He does this wonderfully by choosing his words carefully, raising his voice at certain times, getting red in the face, and altering hi hand gestures. I would say that the amount of practice that he did for this poem was the right amount. In fact it is the perfect amount to get his point/moral across. Because of his emotion and passion he is able to clearly get his points across, many that are relatable and understandable.

Video 2:
This politician has the same amount of passion as Taylor but he doesn’t show it as methodically as Taylor, and as a result he comes across a little too strong. His mistakes are that he doesn’t know the speech enough by heart and has to constantly ruin his streak to look back at his notes. On top of the note errors he also comes off really strong, like I said earlier, a little too strong. His strongest area is emotion and he does make it memorable, but not the good memorable. So he does sell me on his idea, but only because I’d be afraid he would seek me out and kill me if I didn’t follow him.

Richard said...

This first video did not sound like it was rehearsed. He was passionate, actually very passionate. He demonstrated that he knows the subject, and he only tells stories. Even though his tone was aggressive, he incorporated humor into his presentation that counterbalanced the fact that he yelled throughout his speech. On the other hand, the man talking in the second video was not prepared. His thoughts did not connect. The only reason as to why people laughed during this man's speech was because he sounded like an idiot. He had no meaning behind his words. He may have been passionate, but the audience (us) thought he was yelling for no reason. The man in the first video was relatable. He reminded me of a Seinfeld episode because he was able to take first-world teacher problems and address them to audience who can connect to him. Teachers are taken for granted, and, that day, he made all the teachers feel a little a bit better about their job. The man in the second video was way too rehearsed. He lost his spot in his speech multiple times. He rambles, but he does not realize that he does not have a point or focus. It is everywhere and spontaneous and even though this may sometimes be an effective technique, this man was straight up not prepared. It was kind of painful to watch him.

Austin Selvig said...

Video One:
Taylor Mali’s poem was obviously rehearsed but doesn’t seem fake and generic. Mali likely performed this and revised it many times before perfecting it, a common practice among performers. His feeling are real even if they were practiced before. This type of poem is a great example of a slam poem. Mali gets his ideas across in an “angry” tone, but if you were to hear this poem in a lighter tone, would it be as memorable? His practice certainly paid off. No matter how many times you do something, you won’t burn out if you’re passionate about it. It’s hard to imagine Mali ever burning out with this poem and with his teaching due to the unscripted emotion he pours into his work. As a future teacher, Mali doesn’t “sell” me his occupation, he strengthens my desire to bring my passion and ideas to wherever I end up. Throughout the speech, his examples strike me. “Why won’t I let you go to the bathroom? Because you’re bored and you don’t really have to go.” Although we all have needs, he understands his students and what they’re really thinking. He pushes them to do great things and doesn’t settle for anything that isn’t their all. He brings emotion to the table and undoubtedly brings that to his work place. He seemingly instills these traits in his students without even saying much (or anything) at all. After hearing Mali’s speech, it’s going to be incredibly hard to forget. He was relatable, influential, and memorable in a crowded array of slam poems.

Video Two:
Like Donald Trump, there is something incredibly laughable about this guy. Although I’m sure he practiced, he seemed unprepared and very nervous. After realizing how bad he had started, it seems like his strategy was to be memorable through fear and through being remarkably unprofessional. Although I can’t deny that he has passion, his delivery was way off for what he was trying to accomplish. He seemed angry for no apparent reason during his speech. If he gets this angry during his speech, how is he going to react when faced with real life problems? His “outburst” reminded me even more of Donald Trump. Under the circumstances, his messages and delivery were inappropriate. His credentials were appropriate for the job he was seeking, but he offered too much information on himself and not enough on what precisely he wanted to accomplish. If he were to calm his movement and lower his voice, he probably would have delivered a more promising speech. Although he seems very motivated to change things, he is way too into the idea of changing things immediately instead of gradually working his way there. As we all know, politics and rapid change are worst enemies. Throughout his speech, I was never entirely sure where he was going with his ideas and he seemed to lack a solid plan for what he wanted to do. Despite the contents of his speech not being memorable, his delivery and actions were undeniably memorable. For some reason, this guy reminds me of an insanely passionate coach.

Austin Selvig said...

Video One:
Taylor Mali’s poem was obviously rehearsed but doesn’t seem fake and generic. Mali likely performed this and revised it many times before perfecting it, a common practice among performers. His feeling are real even if they were practiced before. This type of poem is a great example of a slam poem. Mali gets his ideas across in an “angry” tone, but if you were to hear this poem in a lighter tone, would it be as memorable? His practice certainly paid off. No matter how many times you do something, you won’t burn out if you’re passionate about it. It’s hard to imagine Mali ever burning out with this poem and with his teaching due to the unscripted emotion he pours into his work. As a future teacher, Mali doesn’t “sell” me his occupation, he strengthens my desire to bring my passion and ideas to wherever I end up. Throughout the speech, his examples strike me. “Why won’t I let you go to the bathroom? Because you’re bored and you don’t really have to go.” Although we all have needs, he understands his students and what they’re really thinking. He pushes them to do great things and doesn’t settle for anything that isn’t their all. He brings emotion to the table and undoubtedly brings that to his work place. He seemingly instills these traits in his students without even saying much (or anything) at all. After hearing Mali’s speech, it’s going to be incredibly hard to forget. He was relatable, influential, and memorable in a crowded array of slam poems.

Video Two:
Like Donald Trump, there is something incredibly laughable about this guy. Although I’m sure he practiced, he seemed unprepared and very nervous. After realizing how bad he had started, it seems like his strategy was to be memorable through fear and through being remarkably unprofessional. Although I can’t deny that he has passion, his delivery was way off for what he was trying to accomplish. He seemed angry for no apparent reason during his speech. If he gets this angry during his speech, how is he going to react when faced with real life problems? His “outburst” reminded me even more of Donald Trump. Under the circumstances, his messages and delivery were inappropriate. His credentials were appropriate for the job he was seeking, but he offered too much information on himself and not enough on what precisely he wanted to accomplish. If he were to calm his movement and lower his voice, he probably would have delivered a more promising speech. Although he seems very motivated to change things, he is way too into the idea of changing things immediately instead of gradually working his way there. As we all know, politics and rapid change are worst enemies. Throughout his speech, I was never entirely sure where he was going with his ideas and he seemed to lack a solid plan for what he wanted to do. Despite the contents of his speech not being memorable, his delivery and actions were undeniably memorable. For some reason, this guy reminds me of an insanely passionate coach.

Austin Selvig said...

Video One:
Taylor Mali’s poem was obviously rehearsed but doesn’t seem fake and generic. Mali likely performed this and revised it many times before perfecting it, a common practice among performers. His feeling are real even if they were practiced before. This type of poem is a great example of a slam poem. Mali gets his ideas across in an “angry” tone, but if you were to hear this poem in a lighter tone, would it be as memorable? His practice certainly paid off. No matter how many times you do something, you won’t burn out if you’re passionate about it. It’s hard to imagine Mali ever burning out with this poem and with his teaching due to the unscripted emotion he pours into his work. As a future teacher, Mali doesn’t “sell” me his occupation, he strengthens my desire to bring my passion and ideas to wherever I end up. Throughout the speech, his examples strike me. “Why won’t I let you go to the bathroom? Because you’re bored and you don’t really have to go.” Although we all have needs, he understands his students and what they’re really thinking. He pushes them to do great things and doesn’t settle for anything that isn’t their all. He brings emotion to the table and undoubtedly brings that to his work place. He seemingly instills these traits in his students without even saying much (or anything) at all. After hearing Mali’s speech, it’s going to be incredibly hard to forget. He was relatable, influential, and memorable in a crowded array of slam poems.

Video Two:
Like Donald Trump, there is something incredibly laughable about this guy. Although I’m sure he practiced, he seemed unprepared and very nervous. After realizing how bad he had started, it seems like his strategy was to be memorable through fear and through being remarkably unprofessional. Although I can’t deny that he has passion, his delivery was way off for what he was trying to accomplish. He seemed angry for no apparent reason during his speech. If he gets this angry during his speech, how is he going to react when faced with real life problems? His “outburst” reminded me even more of Donald Trump. Under the circumstances, his messages and delivery were inappropriate. His credentials were appropriate for the job he was seeking, but he offered too much information on himself and not enough on what precisely he wanted to accomplish. If he were to calm his movement and lower his voice, he probably would have delivered a more promising speech. Although he seems very motivated to change things, he is way too into the idea of changing things immediately instead of gradually working his way there. As we all know, politics and rapid change are worst enemies. Throughout his speech, I was never entirely sure where he was going with his ideas and he seemed to lack a solid plan for what he wanted to do. Despite the contents of his speech not being memorable, his delivery and actions were undeniably memorable. For some reason, this guy reminds me of an insanely passionate coach.

Austin Selvig said...

Video One:
Taylor Mali’s poem was obviously rehearsed but doesn’t seem fake and generic. Mali likely performed this and revised it many times before perfecting it, a common practice among performers. His feelings are real even if they were practiced before. This type of poem is a great example of a slam poem. Mali gets his ideas across in an “angry” tone, but if you were to hear this poem in a lighter tone, would it be as memorable? His practice certainly paid off. No matter how many times you do something, you won’t burn out if you’re passionate about it. It’s hard to imagine Mali ever burning out with this poem and with his teaching due to the unscripted emotion he pours into his work. As a future teacher, Mali doesn’t “sell” me his occupation, he strengthens my desire to bring my passion and ideas to wherever I end up. Throughout the speech, his examples strike me. “Why won’t I let you go to the bathroom? Because you’re bored and you don’t really have to go.” Although we all have needs, he understands his students and what they’re really thinking. He pushes them to do great things and doesn’t settle for anything that isn’t their all. He brings emotion to the table and undoubtedly brings that to his workplace. He seemingly instills these traits in his students without even saying much (or anything) at all. After hearing Mali’s speech, it’s going to be incredibly hard to forget. He was relatable, influential, and memorable in a crowded array of slam poems.

Video Two:
Like Donald Trump, there is something incredibly laughable about this guy. Although I’m sure he practiced, he seemed unprepared and very nervous. After realizing how bad he had started, it seems like his strategy was to be memorable through fear and through being remarkably unprofessional. Although I can’t deny that he has passion, his delivery was way off for what he was trying to accomplish. He seemed angry for no apparent reason during his speech. If he gets this angry during his speech, how is he going to react when faced with real life problems? His “outburst” reminded me even more of Donald Trump. Under the circumstances, his messages and delivery were inappropriate. His credentials were appropriate for the job he was seeking, but he offered too much information on himself and not enough on what precisely he wanted to accomplish. If he were to calm his movement and lower his voice, he probably would have delivered a more promising speech. Although he seems very motivated to change things, he is way too into the idea of changing things immediately instead of gradually working his way there. As we all know, politics and rapid change are worst enemies. Throughout his speech, I was never entirely sure where he was going with his ideas and he seemed to lack a solid plan for what he wanted to do. Despite the contents of his speech not being memorable, his delivery and actions were undeniably memorable. For some reason, this guy reminds me of an insanely passionate coach.

Austin Selvig said...

Video One:
Taylor Mali’s poem was obviously rehearsed but doesn’t seem fake and generic. Mali likely performed this and revised it many times before perfecting it, a common practice among performers. His feeling are real even if they were practiced before. This type of poem is a great example of a slam poem. Mali gets his ideas across in an “angry” tone, but if you were to hear this poem in a lighter tone, would it be as memorable? His practice certainly paid off. No matter how many times you do something, you won’t burn out if you’re passionate about it. It’s hard to imagine Mali ever burning out with this poem and with his teaching due to the unscripted emotion he pours into his work. As a future teacher, Mali doesn’t “sell” me his occupation, he strengthens my desire to bring my passion and ideas to wherever I end up. Throughout the speech, his examples strike me. “Why won’t I let you go to the bathroom? Because you’re bored and you don’t really have to go.” Although we all have needs, he understands his students and what they’re really thinking. He pushes them to do great things and doesn’t settle for anything that isn’t their all. He brings emotion to the table and undoubtedly brings that to his work place. He seemingly instills these traits in his students without even saying much (or anything) at all. After hearing Mali’s speech, it’s going to be incredibly hard to forget. He was relatable, influential, and memorable in a crowded array of slam poems.

Video Two:
Like Donald Trump, there is something incredibly laughable about this guy. Although I’m sure he practiced, he seemed unprepared and very nervous. After realizing how bad he had started, it seems like his strategy was to be memorable through fear and through being remarkably unprofessional. Although I can’t deny that he has passion, his delivery was way off for what he was trying to accomplish. He seemed angry for no apparent reason during his speech. If he gets this angry during his speech, how is he going to react when faced with real life problems? His “outburst” reminded me even more of Donald Trump. Under the circumstances, his messages and delivery were inappropriate. His credentials were appropriate for the job he was seeking, but he offered too much information on himself and not enough on what precisely he wanted to accomplish. If he were to calm his movement and lower his voice, he probably would have delivered a more promising speech. Although he seems very motivated to change things, he is way too into the idea of changing things immediately instead of gradually working his way there. As we all know, politics and rapid change are worst enemies. Throughout his speech, I was never entirely sure where he was going with his ideas and he seemed to lack a solid plan for what he wanted to do. Despite the contents of his speech not being memorable, his delivery and actions were undeniably memorable. For some reason, this guy reminds me of an insanely passionate coach.

Naomi Self said...

1) Taylor Mali uses his personal story to convey his passion. The eloquence and fluidity of his speech allows the audience full immersion into what he's saying. The obvious time that he spent practicing his speech in no way stifles his words, it only amplifies them. The story Mali uses creates a foundation for him to work from and connect back to as he speaks, which makes his speech more memorable through the meaningful repetition. I think that emotion is the most prominent and impacting influence on Mali's speech because without the connection he makes through his emotional delivery, the speech would be void of its engagement.
2)The biggest mistake that this speaker makes is that he hasn't memorized his speech. This seems like something small and insignificant in regards to the rest of his mistakes, but if he had memorized his speech, he would've been able to apply intonation in the appropriate places instead of everywhere in the hopes of sounding passionate. However, his "passion" still isn't sufficient because it makes him look ill-prepared and undermines his approach. If he was passionate about his cause, wouldn't he have put the effort in to make his speech organized and excellent? Every example that this speaker uses is completely drowned out by his enthusiasm and becomes irrelevant to the audience because they're so caught up in his demeanor. He makes himself look foolish, which pulls me away from supporting his cause instead of buying into it. His strongest element is being memorable (this needs no explanation).

Naomi Self said...

1) Taylor Mali uses his personal story to convey his passion. The eloquence and fluidity of his speech allows the audience full immersion into what he's saying. The obvious time that he spent practicing his speech in no way stifles his words, it only amplifies them. The story Mali uses creates a foundation for him to work from and connect back to as he speaks, which makes his speech more memorable through the meaningful repetition. I think that emotion is the most prominent and impacting influence on Mali's speech because without the connection he makes through his emotional delivery, the speech would be void of its engagement.
2)The biggest mistake that this speaker makes is that he hasn't memorized his speech. This seems like something small and insignificant in regards to the rest of his mistakes, but if he had memorized his speech, he would've been able to apply intonation in the appropriate places instead of everywhere in the hopes of sounding passionate. However, his "passion" still isn't sufficient because it makes him look ill-prepared and undermines his approach. If he was passionate about his cause, wouldn't he have put the effort in to make his speech organized and excellent? Every example that this speaker uses is completely drowned out by his enthusiasm and becomes irrelevant to the audience because they're so caught up in his demeanor. He makes himself look foolish, which pulls me away from supporting his cause instead of buying into it. His strongest element is being memorable (this needs no explanation).

Kade Nelson said...

What is his biggest mistake?
2. He is clearly passionate, but why isn't passion enough?
3. What could he have done better?
4. Are his examples effective?
5. Does he "sell" you on his idea?
6. What is his strongest area? (emotion, lovely, or being memorable)?
Passion isn't enough when you have trouble speaking. He couldn't say more than three sentences without going back to his sheet to see what to say next. It was horrible unorganized and he frankly looked like a fool up there.
His biggest mistake is also what he could have done better; be more organized. Sure he had passion and really cared about what he was talking about, but he was so unorganized and had no clue what to say next that it was hard to take him seriously. I laughed at him 90% of the time.
His examples aren't that effective because he doesn't have them memorized; he doesn't know them by heart. He has to look at that sheet of paper every 10 seconds to remind him what to say next. Not a very effective way of getting your message across.
No he doesn't sell me on his idea. Yeah he had passion when he spoke but that wasn't enough to convince me that he would be the best guy for whatever he is running for. How unorganized he was was enough to convince me that he doesn't truly know his facts and that he probably isn't the smartest, most reliable guy for whatever job he is running for.
Emotion is easily his strongest area. He is basically yelling at some parts. If that isn't showing emotion I don't know what is.

Sara Fanfulik said...

I think Mali's presentation came off a bit rehearsed, but it didn't show to much. He brought so much energy and enthusiasm and passion to the stage that it all seemed like a story, which it was. I think he shows his emotion through his passion, he is passionate about making a difference in teaching his students and not being like other teachers. He very much selled me on his idea. Many people if you ask them what do they make with their job, their automatic assumption is money, I mean mine is. So it is a different perspective to look at it as he makes in a difference in those students' lives. He proves that teachers aren't "just teachers" that they truly have an impact on the students ideas and lives, whether they realize it or not. His examples are more than effective, I still have a hard time spelling definitely so by pushing his students to be the best they can be and be who they are is remarkable. I wouldn't have minded having him as a teacher. His classroom would be a lot more captivating than some teachers. I would say his strongest point would maybe be being memorable. I mean how could you forget a teacher that called your house at night to tell your parents something GOOD you did. I've never heard of a teacher doing that, it's always something bad if they're directly calling to talk to your parents. Guarantee those kids and parents won't forget him.

I believe this poor man's mistake was not having the right emotion. He was truly passionate about what he was talking about but his emotion just didn't come through. Having to constantly look back to his notes shows he obviously wasn't prepared or didn't know the subject he was talking about and he had the same voice through out only he would emphasize certain points. Passion is not enough if you don't fully know what you're talking about. I am passionate about many things, but that doesn't mean I could jump and give a presentation on it and make you all passionate as well because I don't know everything about it only that it means something to me. Sadly, he does not sell me on his idea. I can certainly tell he is passionate about running for whatever he is running for, but he just is too overpowering and doesn't bring a connecting story to the table. I have nothing to relate to him with so it is hard for his idea to blow over with me. Maybe he could have went over and practiced his speech a few times. Revised it a little to make it more relatable or have some feedback from others before presenting so he could perfect it more and show the same emotion as Taylor Mali.

Sara Fanfulik said...

I think Mali's presentation came off a bit rehearsed, but it didn't show to much. He brought so much energy and enthusiasm and passion to the stage that it all seemed like a story, which it was. I think he shows his emotion through his passion, he is passionate about making a difference in teaching his students and not being like other teachers. He very much selled me on his idea. Many people if you ask them what do they make with their job, their automatic assumption is money, I mean mine is. So it is a different perspective to look at it as he makes in a difference in those students' lives. He proves that teachers aren't "just teachers" that they truly have an impact on the students ideas and lives, whether they realize it or not. His examples are more than effective, I still have a hard time spelling definitely so by pushing his students to be the best they can be and be who they are is remarkable. I wouldn't have minded having him as a teacher. His classroom would be a lot more captivating than some teachers. I would say his strongest point would maybe be being memorable. I mean how could you forget a teacher that called your house at night to tell your parents something GOOD you did. I've never heard of a teacher doing that, it's always something bad if they're directly calling to talk to your parents. Guarantee those kids and parents won't forget him.

I believe this poor man's mistake was not having the right emotion. He was truly passionate about what he was talking about but his emotion just didn't come through. Having to constantly look back to his notes shows he obviously wasn't prepared or didn't know the subject he was talking about and he had the same voice through out only he would emphasize certain points. Passion is not enough if you don't fully know what you're talking about. I am passionate about many things, but that doesn't mean I could jump and give a presentation on it and make you all passionate as well because I don't know everything about it only that it means something to me. Sadly, he does not sell me on his idea. I can certainly tell he is passionate about running for whatever he is running for, but he just is too overpowering and doesn't bring a connecting story to the table. I have nothing to relate to him with so it is hard for his idea to blow over with me. Maybe he could have went over and practiced his speech a few times. Revised it a little to make it more relatable or have some feedback from others before presenting so he could perfect it more and show the same emotion as Taylor Mali.

Richard said...

This first video did not sound like it was rehearsed. He was passionate, actually very passionate. He demonstrated that he knows the subject, and he only tells stories. Even though his tone was aggressive, he incorporated humor into his presentation that counterbalanced the fact that he yelled throughout his speech. On the other hand, the man talking in the second video was not prepared. His thoughts did not connect. The only reason as to why people laughed during this man's speech was because he sounded like an idiot. He had no meaning behind his words. He may have been passionate, but the audience (us) thought he was yelling for no reason. The man in the first video was relatable. He reminded me of a Seinfeld episode because he was able to take first-world teacher problems and address them to audience who can connect to him. Teachers are taken for granted, and, that day, he made all the teachers feel a little a bit better about their job. The man in the second video was way too rehearsed. He lost his spot in his speech multiple times. He rambles, but he does not realize that he does not have a point or focus. It is everywhere and spontaneous and even though this may sometimes be an effective technique, this man was straight up not prepared. It was kind of painful to watch him.

Dakota Miller said...

First Video:
1. I feel like it was too rehearsed, but I feel that he made up for the rehearsed story with the emotion he threw in the speech. He really did an excellent job throwing every ounce of his being into the speech.
2. He communicates his emotion with emphasizing words and throwing his spirit out into his retaliation.
3. I feel like his practice did pay off because if he didn't practice, he wouldn't have been able to pour that much emotion out.
4. He did not "sell" me his idea. His story really does hit the heart and make you feel the same way he does, but his idea didn't hit me. If it would've, I'm sure it would've been very memorable.
5. His examples are effective, but they are just helpers with his speech. What really drove the speech was his emotion.
6. Emotion. That's the thing I remember the most of the speech. I may forget what he said in a couple days, but I won't forget the passion he put into every word. He used stories and poured his being into them to sell his idea to us.

Second Video:
1. There were many flaws with his speech, but what I believe is his biggest mistake was his lack of stories. He uses facts and just sounds like he is yelling facts instead of throwing his being into his idea by pouring his passion into stories.
2. He uses his passion in facts, not anecdotes. It just makes him look silly, not a good speaker.
3. Stop sounding so intimidating; use more personal stories.
4. His examples are not effective. I don't remember what he said or even what he wanted.
5. Definitely not. If I don't remember it, how can it have been sold to me?
6. Definitely emotion, but his lack of stories just scares the listener with facts being yelled at you.

lauryn Thune said...

2nd Video:
His biggest mistake is his unpreparedness. He has to keep looking back at his notes constantly, and he completely messed up his quote from Albert Einstein, even when he was reading it off the paper! He seemed nervous, and flustered the whole time and it was distracting.
Passion doesn’t mean your good at something. You can be the most passionate person on the basketball team, but that doesn’t mean you are good at basketball. What makes you good is practice, knowing what you are doing, and knowing what you need to accomplish.
He could have just slowed down and taken a breath. Screaming at the audience is not going to make them listen. They will listen when they care about what you are saying. He just yelled at us and never really connected with us.
No his examples are not effective. The quote he used he did not even say right. Granted he did finally clarify but by then the audience was unengaged to what he was saying and just thinking about how he messed up.
No he did not sell me on his idea. From what his speech showed, he is a unorganized, flustered, and kinda crazy person. These qualities do not make for a successful county treasurer. A treasurer needs to be organized and proper, which he is not.
His strongest area is his emotion. His speech does show that he has a strong view that he should be the county treasurer, but honestly he showed emotion too aggressively.

Alexis Lane Blogs said...

I really liked the first video because it reminded me a lot of speech. There is so much enthusiasm that he gives off. It is obviously rehearsed because he didn't miss a beat, but if he hadn't rehearsed, I don't think he would have gotten the same message across. He wasn't exactly "selling" his idea, he was sharing. There is a huge difference in selling and sharing I feel.
The part where he switches gears a bit and starts talking about what he "makes" was the most enjoyable part. He didn't make it about money. He made it about the impacts. His loudness makes sure you are still listening. How can you not be listening? Each part he says, from the moment he talks about making an impact on the children and the final line, how can you not be listening? Usually I don't like "yelling" because it seems unnecessary, but this guy manages to do it in an interesting way.

In the second video, the dude is clearly prepared and unprepared at the same time. He knows what he is supposed to say, but he doesn't know how to present it. It is just hard to watch, and since I remember watching it before, I actually didn't get farther than the first thirty seconds.
There is a difference in being passionate and talking passionately. It is super easy to fake talking passionately. What this guy does is over the top. He doesn't understand the line between being truly passionate and sounding like an idiot (in a way). By walking around a lot, it detracts from the actual speech. And the need to get louder at parts he thinks he needs to is unnecessary. Speech mode is kicking in.
If he was able to compose himself and know when to put in the emotion, then it would be a much better speech. He just needs a few of Key Teeter's speech lessons and then he'd be all set to go.

Cole Johnson said...

I don't think that he has come across too rehearsed. He doesn't pause at all or try and find his place in his speech so it leads us to believe that he is winging it. I think that his many rehearsals have made it a tremendously better speech because he knows exactly what he needs to say and how he should say it. He knows how to make pauses that makes us want to hear what he is about to say and he knows when to get louder at moments he wants the listener to fully understand. I love this guys speech because he truly shows passion in what he is talking about. By not having to look at any note cards, he shows that he is truly speaking from the heart. Or in this case, from both memory and heart. When he speaks, you can definitely tell that he truly believes in what he is saying and this makes us the listeners believe it too. I think he was able to nail the art of story telling because he is so explosive with his story telling and it all seems to flow with one another.
I feel that this guy didn't rehearse enough. He tried to do the things that Taylor Mali did with his speech but he did those things in totally wrong areas of his speech. He emphasizes things that don't need to be emphasized and he yells in places for no reason. I could hardly follow along with what he is running for because I could hardly understand him when he is yelling so loudly. He did a terrible job of influencing the people he is trying to get votes from too. I think he did more scaring then influencing. I am sure people left after his speech wondering what is wrong with that man rather than wondering whether they should vote for him or not.

Elle Jorgenson said...

Taylor Mali
This slam poem blew my mind. I absolutely fell in love with his speaking style; he was loud and passionate about his opinions and he kept us grasping at his words. Did it come across as rehearsed? I think that its obvious that he practiced, but if he hadn't, would his poem have been as effective? Absolutely not. His emotions came across and we could tell that he was passionate about teaching and that he wasn't going to let a lawyer make fun of "what he makes". Mali did a really good job of selling his ideas to us. It's always been a thought of mine that teachers are one of the few professions that don't make a living off of other people's misfortunes, and he basically summed up why I want to be a teacher. For me, obviously passion was a strong suit of his, and it really came across in his performance.

The Republican
This man has passion, that is a given, but for me, its almost overbearing, and makes me want to get up out of my seat and run out of there... granted, republicans do that to me anyways. He has passion, but its misplaced. Obviously he'd like to win the treasurer position, but he didn't need that much enthusiasm for a candidate speech. To make his performance a heck of a lot better, he could have calmed the heck down. His performance wouldn't have been so awkward if he hadn't walked about from the podium screaming, only to pause, return to the podium to collect his thoughts, and then start yelling again. Does he sell me on his idea? No, I am too far liberal to even consider voting for him. Besides that, even if I was a republican, his yelling would have scared me out of a vote. The thing that this man has going for his is that he is memorable. I will forever remember the republican who screamed at me to get his vote.

Jace J said...

I do feel like his speech sounds way too rehearsed. His speaking voice carries the same flow that a preacher's does in a church. He also has a very fake sounding laugh that seems to start and stop on a dime.
He is using his loud voice, humor, and his excitement to show that he is very emotional about his topic.
He definitely inspires his audience to go out and do something, but the overly rehearsed start leading straight into his loud rant make this presentation seem like an angry rant that will never help anyone.
He sounds way to angry and aggressive to be a part of anything that I would want to join.
I don't think his examples are very effective because they aren't very specific, and one example gets completely turned around when an audience member tells Mali his pay.
His strongest area definitely has to be emotion because whenever I pause the video, I forget what he has said, but I remember the emotions he puts into the speech.

He is yelling in a very cracky voice almost right away when he starts.
He is just yelling, he doesn't seem like he would inspire anyone to support his cause. He turns it into a yelling match without really telling about what he is actually going to do if he is elected.
He could have been better by calming his voice down and talking with the audience, instead of shouting at them. I think he could have made a better emotional connection with the audience if he would have started off with a softer voice.
I do like the examples he gives, but he doesn't necessarily say what he is going to do if he is elected.
He doesn't sell me on his idea because he seems very angry, and negativity doesn't usually sell in my book.
His strongest area is definitely being memorable as the politician who likes to yell almost right away.

Ethan Halvorson said...

1st Video - I think he is definitely a good speaker, but some of the parts did come out a little rehearsed to me but overall he did a great job. The poem the he states in the video is phenomenal, and it really gets his point across. He is very, very passionate about his teaching job and he obviously has some strong feelings about what other people think of his profession and really his lifestyle. I feel like he takes the 'saying', "those who can, do. Those who can't, teach.", to heart and really personalizes it with his own actions and beliefs.

2nd Video - The biggest mistake that he made is that he doesn't seem like he had rehearsed the speech at all. He is cracking and screeching the whole time and it just doesn't really come off as appealing. While yes, he is passionate, unless he can figure out how to get across his point without yelling all the time, people are going to start taking him as a joke. I think that he could have maybe just ran it past someone with some idea about public speaking and they would have told him to tone it down a bit. His examples are effective, and he does sell me his idea, but I don't think I would elect someone like him. His strongest area is definitely emotion and being memorable. He uses a lot of emotion, but he uses it in the wrong way, and I really don't think I will forget this video for a long time.

Alex King said...

Video 1:
I think it does come off as rehearsed but in a good way. He uses emotion in his speech and makes sure the audience knows that he isn't just winging it. Mali uses the tone of his voice to communicate his emotions. He starts of using a normal tone then shows his anger through projecting his voice at his audience which grabs their attention. Yes his practice pays off because you can definitely see how much he cares about this topic and how it affects him. If he didn't care he wouldn't have put so much time into rehearsing his talk.Yes he sells me on his idea that although teachers don't make more money than lawyers they make the future and shape young minds, Which is more valuable then money. Yes his examples really drive what he is saying home. He lays out a scenario and backs it up with examples. I think his strongest are is his emotions that you can see he is portraying through his voice and also his facial expressions.

Video 2:
No the second video doesn't come off across rehearsed at all. This guy seems like the type to scribble some of his thoughts down on a napkin 15 minutes before he goes up to talk. He constantly has to look at his sheet and forgets what he says half way through saying something. This guy communicates his emotions by just yelling about everything. I don't think there was a reason for his yelling he just felt that it would engage his audience but in all reality it probably just made them laugh. I don't think he really practiced or rehearsed his speech at al...No he does not sell me on his ideas because half the time you can't understand the point he is trying to make. He is one of those people that just talks to hear himself. I don't really know if his examples were affective depends on if his audience liked what he was saying. His strongest area was his passion for wanting to be the treasurer. He may not be good at giving speeches but you can tell if he got the job he would be very passionate and not let anyone down.

Kaylee Eskeli said...

1. I don't think that he came off as too rehearsed, but I think he definitely did have a little bit of that element in his speech. In my public speaking class, we always talk about how you should know what you want to say, but that you shouldn't necessarily know the exact words you want to say. I think that concept was in play here. Mali communicates his emotion through his words, obviously, but I think he communicates even more through his body language. His hand gestures, the reddening of his face, and his changing tone of voice indicate how emotional he feels about this topic. I think that his examples are effective, but they are a little different then what you'd expect. Overall, he definitely sold the audience on his idea, and probably sold the majority of the people who have watched this video on his idea.

2. I'd have to say that his biggest mistake, at least in my opinion, are some of the things he said. I think that most people would agree that his tone of voice and emotional level are quite over the top. However, I think that the words he is actually saying when describing why he wanted his parties nomination seem selfish and self- centered. For example, he used: "I'm a fighter, I'm this, I'm that." rather than "I want to do this for our party, etc." If this was my parties caucus, I would absolutely not vote for him, so I'd say he didn't sell me on his idea. If I had to choose a strong area for him, it would be being memorable. (Not that it's necessarily a way that one would want to be remembered)